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Malin Bridge - viewed towards Hillsborough The same view today (Holme Lane makes its way towards Hillsborough)

The modern photo was taken from the Rivelin Valley Road junction, and shows the view along Holme Lane towards Hillsborough. The old photograph shows the same view, though was possibly taken from a little further to the right, and a little further back. The 'Malin Bridge Inn' is indicated in both pictures (the current one was built on the same site as the original)


Ruins of The Stag Inn (foreground) at Malin Bridge (viewed towards Hillsborough)THE STAG INN - MALIN BRIDGE

The cellar walls - seen in the immediate foreground - were all that remained of the Stag Inn. The adjoining houses were totally washed away. Immediately to the left of this site, Holme Lane makes its way (between the gap in the buildings - as seen here) towards Hillsborough. The river runs just off the photograph to the right.

From the Stag Inn and its adjoining house died twelve members of the Armitage family . . . . see grave photograph below.

 

Stag Inn foundations (left) - Malin Bridge Inn ruins (right) (Hillsborough is to the right)THE STAG INN / MALIN BRIDGE INN

This photograph was taken from the opposite side of the River Loxley (looking towards Wisewood - Hillsborough is to the right). The site of the Stag Inn and its adjoining houses lies on the extreme left of this scene. Just to the right of the heavily damaged house seen in the centre of the picture, and on the far side of Holme Lane are the ruins of the Malin Bridge Inn - or 'The Cleakum', as it was better known then.

Samuel Harrison writes of the incidents connected with the Stag Inn:

'The Stag public house was situated opposite the row of houses which were destroyed at Malin Bridge. The following is a list of its occupants, who were all drowned --Eliza Armitage, aged 67; William Armitage, aged 37; his wife Ann, aged 42; five children of William Armitage; a servant named Elizabeth Crownshaw, and two lodgers, named James Frith and Henry Hall. The house was swept away, and all the inmates were drowned. The body of Mrs. Armitage was found with nothing upon it except a pair of stockings. The servant, Elizabeth Crownshaw [see grave-stone below], had been there only a few days. Her brother, Joseph Crownshaw, who lives near Wisewood Works, higher up the valley, had just got home from Sheffield when he saw the flood coming; he immediately thought of his sister at the Stag Inn, and resolved to set off to her rescue. When he had proceeded only a few yards the water knocked him down, and he fell on his back. He managed to get up again, and it was all he could do to save himself. At the back of the Stag Inn, several cottages were demolished, and in them were drowned Thomas Bates, his wife, and two children; Thomas Bullond or Bullard, and his wife; also Greaves Armitage, his wife, and two children. Greaves Armitage was brother to Mr Armitage, of the Stag Inn; so that there were twelve of this family drowned.' (GFAS)

Geoffrey Amey's version of the events:

'The stone bridge at Malin Bridge was battered and borne away, after which the flood divided into two principal courses of destruction. Just a few yards from where the Spooners died was the Stag Inn, of which little was left standing. The landlady, Eliza Armitage, an elderly widow, was drowned along with her son, William, an anvil maker of thirty-five, his wife, Ann, and their five young children; next door the younger son, Greaves (twenty-eight), who followed the same trade as his brother, died with his wife, Maria, and their two little daughters, aged three years and four months. So departed twelve Armitages in a matter of seconds. That inn also proved a death trap for Elizabeth Crownshaw, a seventeen year old domestic servant, for Henry Hall (a guest there that night) and for James Frith.' (CDDD)

THE FLOOD. --- Missing from the Stag Inn, Malin Bridge, HENRY HALL, Age 38;
Height 6 feet. Has Sandy Whiskers. -- Apply to Thos. Hall, 44, West John st.


THE GRAVE OF THE ARMITAGE FAMILY - THE STAG INN - MALIN BRIDGE

In Affectionate Remembrance of

ELIZA ARMITAGE
AGED 67 YEARS

ALSO HER TWO SONS AND THEIR WIVES
AND SEVEN CHILDREN
WHO WERE ALL DROWNED AT MALIN BRIDGE
BY THE BRADFIELD INUNDATION, SATURDAY MARCH
12th 1864, SEVEN OF WHOM WERE INTERRED HERE MARCH 16th
THOSE MARKED THUS * HAVE NOT BEEN FOUND

WILLIAM ARMITAGE
AGED 36 YEARS
ALSO HIS WIFE
ANN.
AGED 42 YEARS
AND THEIR FIVE CHILDREN
CHARLES. AGED 11 YEARS
*
HENRY. AGED 9 YEARS
*
SAMUEL. AGED 7 YEARS
WILLIAM. AGED 4 YEARS
AND *
MARIA. AGED 3 YEARS.
GREAVES ARMITAGE
AGED 28 YEARS
ALSO HIS WIFE
MARIA
AGED 30 YEARS
AND THEIR TWO CHILDREN
*
MARY.
AGED 3 YEARS 
AND 
*
ELIZABETH
AGED 4 MONTHS 

(VERSE)

The Armitage family grave - Loxley Old Chapel


THE GRAVE OF ELIZABETH CROWNSHAW
(newly employed servant to the Armitage family at The Stag Inn - Malin Bridge)

The Grave of Elizabeth Crownshaw (Servant at the Stag Inn) - Loxley Old Chapel
In Affectionate Remembrance of

HANNAH ELIZABETH,
THE BELOVED DAUGHTER OF
JOHN AND HANNAH CROWNSHAW,
WHO WAS DROWNED IN THE INUNDATION AT MALIN BRIDGE.
MARCH 12th 1864. AGED 17 YEARS.

THE ROSE IN ITS BEAUTIFUL BLOOM,
THE SUN'S BRIGHTEST GLORIES DECLINE:
SO EARLY CAME IN TO THE TOMB,
REPENT LEST THE CAST SHOULD BE THINE.
THE BUSY TRIBES OF FLESH AND BLOOD,
WITH ALL THEIR CARES AND FEARS:
ARE CARRIED DOWNWARD BY THE FLOOD,
AND LOST IN FOLLOWING YEARS.

ALSO THE ABOVE NAMED JOHN CROWNSHAW,
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE JANUARY 20th 1881,
AGED 67 YEARS,
ALSO HANNAH RELICT OF THE ABOVE
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE AUGUST 2nd 1883,
AGED 70 YEARS.


Ruins of The Malin Bridge Inn (viewed towards Hillsborough)

The Malin Bridge Inn ('The Cleakum') - Newspaper Illustration

Two pictures of the Malin Bridge Inn, both viewed in roughly the same direction - towards Hillsborough. Only one corner of the building - that containing the chimney stack - remains standing. The illustration on the right, 'by our special artist', was captioned 'Searching for the dead at Malin Bridge' and presented in the ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS SUPPLEMENT, APRIL 2 1864.

'Nearly opposite to the Stag Inn stood the Malin Bridge Inn, better known as the Cleakum public house.' This was occupied by George Bisby, who was forty-two and doubled as innkeeper and carter; his wife, Sarah; and five of their children: all were swept to their deaths by the raging torrent. 'The ruins of this place attracted the notice of all visitors from its very picturesque and extraordinary appearance. A strong chimney stack, which formed the centre of the house, was left standing with a small portion of the walls of the building. The interior was completely exposed, the floors of the rooms were hanging down supported only at two sides, and altogether the ruins were such as to strike the mind of the visitor with wonder that the destruction should have gone so far and yet have stopped where it did. The body of Bisby and that of his eldest daughter, Teresa, who was fourteen, were found four days later at Sheffield; those of the other five Bisbys were never identified.' (CDDD/GFAS)

'The following anecdote is related in connection with the Cleakum Inn [Malin Bridge Inn]. Some days after the flood a girl named Bisby, about seventeen years of age, the only survivor of the family, she having been from home at the time of the flood, was seen near the wreck of her father's house, apparently in great distress. "With eyes red with tears, she was searching the ruins for mementoes of her lost family, gathering together teacups and saucers and other relics which overhanging stones had preserved more or less completely from destruction. Sympathising visitors clustered round her, to console her distress offering shillings and sixpences for relics not worth a straw. Apparently the poor girl cared nothing for the money, but she allowed the visitors to have their way as regarded all but a few relics to which she clung as too precious to be parted with. Brawny men were to be seen cramming saucers, cups, &c., thus purchased, into their pockets, declaring with tremulous voices their intention to preserve them as mementoes of the sad calamity, but evidently caring more about helping the poor girl in this delicate way than about the relics themselves."' (GFAS)


Taking the dead to the Yew Tree Inn - Malin BridgeTHE DEAD ARE TAKEN TO THE YEW TREE INN (MALIN BRIDGE)

Once again, the ILLUSTRATED LONDON NEWS SUPPLEMENT, APRIL 2 1864. presented this picture ('by our special artist'): it is captioned: 'Conveying the dead to the receiving-house, Malin Bridge' . The receiving house for this area was the Yew Tree Inn - a pub which remains today, and stands directly at the bottom of Dykes Lane.


THE BATES FAMILY GRAVE - LOXLY CHAPEL

This family lived in a cottage near the Stag Inn (Opposite the Malin Bridge Inn) at Malin Bridge. The verse on the grave-stone is somewhat intriguing - was Annie the young child orphaned? If so, why did she not perish with the rest of her family? The ages on the stone suggest that she could have been the eldest daughter, married, and therefore not living 'at home' when the flood occurred; but if this is the case, there must have been another young child belonging to the family, who, for some reason, survived the catastrophe.

The Bates family (of Malin Bridge) grave - Loxley Old Chapel
THIS STONE WAS ERECTED BY

ANNIE BATES, IN AFFECTIONATE REMEMBRANCE OF

HER BLEOVED FATHER, MOTHER AND THREE BROTHERS.

WHO WERE DROWNED IN THE GREAT FLOOD. MARCH 12th 1864.

THOMAS BATES, AGED 42. HARRIET, HIS WIFE AGED 40

GEORGE, AGED 19. TOM, AGED 11.

ALSO WALTER, AGED 15. WHO IS NOT FOUND

 
DEAREST FRIEND WE'RE GONE BEFORE,
OUR LOVE TO YOU WILL BE NO MORE:
WEEP NOT FOR US, BUT PITY TAKE,
AND LOVE OUR ORPHAN FOR OUR SAKE.


Copyright © 2001 Michael Armitage

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