Notes and Sources 5
N.B: The notes/sources below can be accessed individually by clicking on the small, superscripted numbers found with the relevant text throughout this web-site. The 'return' link at the end of each individual note/source will take you back whence you came. Some of the superscripted numbers are followed by a small letter 'n'; this denotes a 'note' as opposed to a mere 'source'. (Internet Explorer users beware: you may not always be 'taken to' or 'returned to' precisely the designated location on the page: for accurate results every time - use Netscape.)

Giving sources relating to Elizabeth Gaskell's 'The Life of Charlotte Brontë' presents a problem: there are so many different editions of this book, it is pointless giving page numbers. In this case I have tried to indicate where the information is located by giving the approximate distance through the relevant chapter (i.e. a quarter way through CH.5). In some cases I have stated the information's proximity to a dated letter - as all letters in the book are presented in date order, and are easy to locate.

BPM = Brontë Parsonage Museum (library).


141) Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.88; and 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.12. & p.97. (return)

142) Indicated in a small booklet on the history of the church ('Holy Trinity - Little Ouseburn', p.3) - obtainable from within the church itself. (This booklet is also the source of the subsequent quote - also p.3.) (return)

143) By positioning oneself such that the alignment of certain points on the church appear the same as the corresponding points in Anne's drawing, it is possible to locate where Anne sat, sketching the scene, to within a couple of feet; though accessing this 'spot' can be difficult as the whole area is currently overgrown with nettles! (Yes, I got my legs nettled in the process - but it was worth it - to hold in front of me the picture sketched by Anne, while standing on the very spot from where she sketched it over a hundred and fifty years earlier - wow!). (return)

144) Clement Shorter, who is regarded as being the Brontë family's first official biographer: Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.35. (return)

145) This diary paper is also presented in full, in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.220; Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.68 - p.69; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.34. (return)

146) Though I have stated that the diary paper appears 'actual size' in the specified 'picture resolution mode', this can only be a close approximation as the width and height of the screen-picture will vary slightly from monitor to monitor - indeed, most monitors have picture width/height adjustment controls which can, and almost certainly will be set a little differently on each unit. Tip: Adjust your picture-width and height controls so that the paper measures 99 x 60 mm. on the screen - then you can view it at the exact same size as the original. (return)

147) This diary paper is also presented in full, in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.271; Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.106; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.53. Also see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.35. (return)

148) Though I have stated that the diary paper appears 'actual size' in the specified 'picture resolution mode', this can only be a close approximation as the width and height of the screen-picture will vary slightly from monitor to monitor - indeed, most monitors have picture width/height adjustment controls which can, and almost certainly will be set a little differently on each unit. Tip: Adjust your picture-width and height controls so that the paper measures 112 x 91 mm. on the screen - then you can view it at the exact same size as the original.

Several biographies specify slightly different dimensions for this diary paper. In Juliet Barker's 'The Brontës', she claims that her reproduced picture of it appears 'actual size' - but it is, in fact, slightly smaller than the original. The actual diary-sheet dimensions of 112 x 91 mm. have been confirmed by the BPM. (return)

149) In the penultimate chapter of Agnes Grey, Agnes takes an early morning walk along the sands, ultimately reaching the 'low rocks out at sea' from where she looks back towards the town 'to see who next was stirring . . . But however interesting such a scene might be, I could not wait to witness it, for the sun and the sea so dazzled my eyes in that direction, that I could but afford one glance. . .'  The sun certainly does dazzle ones eyes - reflecting off the sea - when looking back from these rocks early in the morning. Would someone remember such a detail over a year after last experiencing it (which was about the time Anne is reputed to have begun writing Agnes Grey)?  I have undertaken this 'walk' dozens of times over the many years I have visited Scarborough - yet I had to specifically make the 'walk' once again to confirm that this sun/sea dazzle did actually occur! It leaves me convinced that this chapter of Agnes Grey (and possibly the final chapter too) was not written over a year after Anne's last visit to Scarborough, but actually written at the resort itself (it is too precise to be otherwise). (See 'The Sands' - accessed from 'Main Page'.) It therefore has to be a strong possibility that this was part of 'the fourth volume of Solala Vernon's Life': it certainly could have been part of 'Passages In the Life of an Individual', which she began writing several years later, and was probably just a development of 'Solala Vernon's Life' (See Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.126). (return)

150) These diary papers are also presented in full, in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.358/359; Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.164 - p.165; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.73 - p.75. (return)

151) Some biographers have omitted from their quotations of this diary paper, the line relating to Branwell leaving Thorp Green. Juliet Barker insists that it is present on the original manuscript (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.456), and gives an explanation of its inclusion (p.924 - note 49). (return)

152) These diary papers are also presented in full, in Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.209 - p.211; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.92 - p.95: Some sections of them are given in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.453 - p.456. (return)

153) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.113. (return)

154) The three that were sent to Ellen Nussey are held at the BPM; the one to William Smith Williams is preserved in the British Museum - Ashley Library; and the one to Rev. David Thom is held in Princeton, USA. (return)

155) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.158; also PJM Scott, 'Anne Brontë', p.132. (return)

156) Barker, 'The Brontës', p.529. (return)

157) This letter is also presented in full, in Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.272: some sections of it are given in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.529. (return)

158) Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.270/271. (return)

159) This letter is also presented in full, in Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.271; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.112: a section is also given in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.543; and in Barker, 'The Brontës: A Life In Letters', p.182. (return)

160) Amelia Ringrose receives several mentions in Anne's letters: she eventually became a friend and correspondent of Charlotte - visiting the Haworth Parsonage in 1854. (return)

161) This letter is also presented in full, in Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.284; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.132: also, most of it is given in Barker, 'The Brontës: A Life In Letters', p.208. (return)

162) This letter is also presented in full, in Barker, 'The Brontës: A Life In Letters', p.220: a section is also given in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.580; and a few notes on the letter - and on Rev. (Dr.) David Thom are presented in Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.175. (return)

163) This letter is also presented in full, in Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.307; and in Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.147; and in Barker, 'The Brontës: A Life In Letters', p.228/229: sections are also given in Barker, 'The Brontës', p.588/589. Also see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.182. (return)

164) Only five of Anne's letters are known to have survived. The three that were sent to Ellen Nussey, all of which are preserved at the BPM, were written in this 'crossed' format (it is not clear about the other two). Several of Charlotte's letters are also written in this mode. (return)

165) Anne Brontë's Song Book, June 1843. BPM: also see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.107; and Barker, 'The Brontës', p.919 - note 83. (return)

166) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.36. (return)

167) This was presumably the first line of the song, rather than the title, - see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.114. (return)

168) The Robinsons' interest in music is shown in Mr. Robinson's 'cash accounts' where there are entries for, 5 shillings [25p] at a time for the "Scarbro' Band", and the hire of a piano for four weeks. - see Gerin, 'Branwell Brontë - A Biography', p.232. Also, on 20 October 1845, the Robinsons' eldest daughter, Lydia, absconded with and married the play actor Henry Roxby who jointly owned, and performed at the Theatre Royal; strongly indicating that the family, and almost certainly Anne, attended concerts/performances at this establishment. (return)

169) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.111. (return)

170) As a hymn, this composition seems to be generally known by its first line - 'My God! O Let me call Thee mine', though in its poem form, it is titled - 'A Prayer' -see 'The Poems of Anne Brontë' - accessed from 'Main Page'. (return)

171) For various notes regarding Anne's interest in music, and her Music Manuscript copy-book: see Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.34; and 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.103, p.107, p.110/111 & p.114; also Barker, 'The Brontës', p.434. (return)

172) On the actual music manuscript sheet, Anne appears to have written the last line of the first verse as 'My feeble faith still turns (or 'twins'?) to Thee': in the version printed in Edward Chitham's 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', (p.105 & p.181), the same line reads: 'My feeble faith still clings to Thee'. Chitham makes reference to the music manuscript but does not mention this point. (return)

173) 'Anne Brontë's Book of Common Prayer' 1.182D (?); 'Inscription on endpaper' BS 217, BPM. (return)

174) Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.200. (return)

175) Though I have stated that the note appears 'actual size' in the specified 'picture resolution mode', this can only be a close approximation as the width and height of the screen-picture will vary slightly from monitor to monitor - indeed, most monitors have picture width/height adjustment controls which can, and almost certainly will be set a little differently on each unit. Tip: Adjust your picture-width controls so that the match measures 48 mm. on the screen - then the note size will be exactly that of the original. (return)

176) 'At the time, a married woman had no independent legal existence, apart from her husband (c.f. Caroline Norton's English Laws for Women). She could not own her own property, sue for divorce, or control custody of her children. If she attempted to live apart from him, her husband had the right to reclaim her. If she took their child with her, she was liable for kidnapping. In living off her own earnings, she was held to be stealing her husband's property, since any income she made was legally his.' Quoted from: Mary Mark Ockerbloom, 'Anne Brontë (1820 - 1849)' (an Internet biography of Anne - accessed at: http://www.cs.cmu.edu/People/mmbt/women/bronte/bronte-anne.html), Chapter titled 'Mirth and Mourning'. Also see Langland - 'Anne Brontë - The Other One', p.119. (return)

177) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.167. (return)

178) There are several different web-sites presenting the e-text of 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall' - unfortunately, all give the 'mutilated' version of the novel (see my notes on page 'The Novels of Anne Brontë' - accessible from 'Main Page'). E-text based on the 1992 Clarenden edition (which is based on Anne original version) is not yet available - if you know otherwise - please e-mail me! (return)


BPM = Brontë Parsonage Museum (library).


Copyright © 1999 Michael Armitage

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