Notes and Sources 4
N.B: The notes/sources below can be accessed individually by clicking on the small, superscripted numbers found with the relevant text throughout this web-site. The 'return' link at the end of each individual note/source will take you back whence you came. Some of the superscripted numbers are followed by a small letter 'n'; this denotes a 'note' as opposed to a mere 'source'. (Internet Explorer users beware: you may not always be 'taken to' or 'returned to' precisely the designated location on the page: for accurate results every time - use Netscape.)

Giving sources relating to Elizabeth Gaskell's 'The Life of Charlotte Brontë' presents a problem: there are so many different editions of this book, it is pointless giving page numbers. In this case I have tried to indicate where the information is located by giving the approximate distance through the relevant chapter (i.e. a quarter way through CH.5). In some cases I have stated the information's proximity to a dated letter - as all letters in the book are presented in date order, and are easy to locate.

BPM = Brontë Parsonage Museum (library).


106) Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.49 & p.166. Also, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.40. Also see Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.57. (return)

107) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.78. (return)

108) Also see Barker, 'The Brontës', p.342. In this section, Barker remarks that 'there is actually no evidence that the Robinsons began to take their annual holidays there until the following year [1841]'; however, this is incorrect; the Scarborough Herald and General Advertiser papers covering a period in the latter half of 1839, and currently held in Scarborough Library, indicate that, while the Robinsons were not at Scarborough on Sept 26; 'Rev. E. Robinson and Mrs. and family' were at 'No. 12, The Cliff' on Oct 3rd., Oct 10th. and Oct 17th. (there are no 1839 editions after this date). Also, in her associated note (p.901 - note 84) Barker goes on to say: 'The Robinsons do not feature in the list of visitors published in the Scarborough Herald, 13 Aug. 1840 p.3 though they were usually resident at this period in later years. It is possible that the Robinsons visited earlier but there are no earlier extant editions of the Scarborough Herald to confirm this.'. The section I have underlined is also is incorrect - the Robinsons had usually returned to Thorp Green by this period in subsequent years (the exception being in 1842, when they returned around the 15th) so, the fact that they are not recorded in the Scarborough Herald of 13 August (or a later edition) indicates nothing more than, if they did visit Scarborough in 1840, it was during the same period that they visited in the following years! (For all the actual dates that the Robinsons were at Scarborough, refer to the appropriate Scarborough Heralds - most of which can be accessed in the British Library at Collindale: the dates are also given in my 'Chronology of Anne Brontë', accessible from the 'Main Page'.) (return)

109) Weightman left Haworth for Ripon on 14 July (1840) - and there spent a period while in the process of obtaining his ordination - he then went home to Appleby for a holiday, before returning to Haworth in September - see Barker, 'The Brontës', p.339: also see Chitham, A Life of Anne Brontë', p.80/81. (return)

110) Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.173/174. (return)

111) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.87. (return)

112) Chitham, 'A life of Anne Brontë', p.90. The first occasion, when Weightman sent a valentine card to each of the three sisters and Ellen Nussey, occurred in 1840. On 3 March 1841, shortly after Charlotte had begun her employment with the White family, she wrote to Ellen, declaring: 'I daresay you have received a Valentine this year from our bonny-faced friend, the curate of Haworth. I got a precious specimen few days before I left home, but I know better how to treat it than I did those we received a year ago.' Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.71. There is no record of whether Anne received one (at Thorp Green) in 1841; but it has to be a possibility - and it is certainly a possibility that her poem, 'In Memory of a Happy Day in February', of February 1842, is a reference to her receiving one this year too. (return)

113) Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.184. (return)

114) Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.84/85. Edward Chitham makes the point that the poem's failure to be included in Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell, in 1846, suggests its biographical and personal nature; and Charlotte's avoidance of publishing it in 1850 indicates that she, herself, was in no doubt who, and what, the poem referred to: Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.87 & p.175; also, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.95. (return)

115) The poem certainly refers to the sun shining across the sea: this is the meaning of the line 'Athwart the glittering main' - 'main', in literary usage, means 'the open ocean'. (return)

116) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.12 & p.97. (return)

117) She was almost certainly studying German and Latin in order to teach it to her pupils, but may have also been developing her own skills for the Brontës' planned, own school: see Barker, 'The Brontës', p.435 & p.920 - note 89. (return)

118) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.108. (return)

119) Also Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.187; and Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.82. (return)

120) Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.181. (return)

121) On the actual music manuscript sheet, Anne appears to have written the last line of the first verse as 'My feeble faith still turns (or 'twins'?) to Thee': in the version printed in Edward Chitham's 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', (p.105 & p.181), the same line reads: 'My feeble faith still clings to Thee'. Chitham makes reference to the music manuscript but does not mention this point. (return)

122) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.117. (return)

123) Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.91. (return)

124) Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.111 & p.183. (return)

125) The text on the plaque, erected in Haworth Church to the memory of William Weightman reads:

This Monument
was erected by the inhabitants
In Memory of the Late
WILLIAM WEIGHTMAN
 Who died September 6th. 1842, aged 26 years
And was buried in this church
On the tenth of the same month.
He was three years Curate of Haworth
And by the congregation and parishioners
In general was greatly respected
For his orthodox principles, active zeal,
moral habits, learning,
mildness and affability.

His age at death is printed incorrectly - he was actually 28. (return)

126) Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.108. (return)

127) This was not the only poem of Anne's to be published during her lifetime (other than in Poems) - as Edward Chitham reports. Neither was it, as he suggests, the one that brought a smile to Anne's face on discovering it in Fraser's Magazine while Ellen Nussey was at the Parsonage (also suggested by Winifred Gerin; and Ada Harrison - see 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.115). That poem was almost certainly 'The Narrow Way' - See Barker, 'The Brontës', p.580 & p.941 - note 39: also see my notes with 'The Narrow Way', under 'The Poems of Anne Brontë' (accessed from the 'Main Page'). (return)

128) 'The Rescue: James La Trobe and Anne Brontë', article by Margaret Connor in Brontë Society Transactions, Vol. 24, Pt.1, April 1999, p.63. (return)

129) Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.173 (& p.41). Also see Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.301 (bottom). (return)

130) See: Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.4, p.5, p.7, p.8, p.16, p.21. p.152 & p.194: Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.31-34, p.144 & p.155: Elizabeth Langland, 'Anne Brontë - The Other One', p.34, p.63, p.76 & p.142: Gerin, 'Anne Bronte - A Biography', p.319. (return)

131) Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.274. (return)

132) Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.34. (return)

133) Barker, 'The Brontës', p.580 & p.941 - notes 39 & 40. (return)

134) Also see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.178; and Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.299; and Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.139; and Langland, 'Anne Brontë - The Other One', p.23. (return)

135) Barker, 'The Brontës', p.195. (return)

136) Alexander and Sellars, 'The Art of the Brontës', p.148; and 'The Tenant of Wildfell Hall', CH.9 (3/4 way through). (return)

137) Alexander and Sellars, 'The Art of the Brontës', p.148. (return)

138) In 1840, Anne commenced her employment with the Robinsons on 8 May: we know the family were not at Wood's Lodgings on or after 13 August 1840 (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.901 - note 84); so, if they did visit Scarborough this year, it was probably around the same time as in subsequent years - the month of July and possibly encroaching into the first week or two of August. In 1841, dates are also a little difficult to determine: Charlotte returned to Haworth on 30 June to find she had just missed Anne who had left to accompany the family to Scarborough (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.355) (Charlotte told Ellen, Anne was only being allowed 3 weeks holiday because she had to accompany the Robinsons to the resort - Harrison and Stanford, 'Anne Brontë - Her Life and Work', p.71): so the family must have arrived at Scarborough around 29 June. The family are listed as being at the resort in the 22 July edition of the Scarborough Herald (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.903 - note 32), and we know they were there on the 30th as it is stated in Anne's diary paper written on that day. The only reference to the end of this holiday is by Winifred Gerin in her book: 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.165, where she states that 'By the first week in August the family were back again at Thorp Green', though she gives no source for this information. So possibly it was around 3 August. In 1842 the Scarborough Herald papers indicate that the Robinsons were at Scarborough by 7 July, and had left by 18 August (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.398 & p.911 - note 56). In 1843 the Scarborough Herald papers indicate that the Robinsons were at Scarborough by 6 July, and had left by 3 August (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.434 & p.919 - note 84.): this holiday had been cut short by one week - see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.104. In 1844 the Scarborough Herald papers indicate that the Robinsons were at Scarborough by 11 July, and had left by 15 August (Barker, 'The Brontës', p.921 - note 101. Also see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', p.108/109 & p.114). In 1845 the Robinsons visited Scarborough (unaccompanied by Anne or Branwell) from around 4 July until the first week in August (possibly around the 7th). A number of Scarborough papers record their attendance but all give slightly conflicting dates - see Barker, 'The Brontës', p.466 & p.467 & p.926 - note 82. Also see Gerin, 'Anne Brontë - A Biography', p.207. (return)

139) This becomes quite obvious on close inspection of the wall, and comparing it with the old (black/white) photograph of Kirby Hall (this photograph is also presented in Edward Chitham's, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', (illustration 15). (return)

140) Old maps (see Chitham, 'A Life of Anne Brontë', - illustration 14) indicate that the 'Long Plantation' is directly east from Kirby Hall, and it can be very easily identified by using a compass while standing at the site of the Hall. (return)


(Continued on Notes and Sources - page 5)


BPM = Brontë Parsonage Museum (library).


Copyright © 1999 Michael Armitage

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