Lines Written at Thorp Green / Appeal
Written: August 28th. 1840.  First Published: 1846.

On the manuscript, this poem is titled "Lines Written at Thorp Green", though Anne re-named it 'Appeal' for inclusion in Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell which was published in 1846 (both versions are presented below). (Not to be confused with her later poem - written on 19 August 1841 - which she also entitled 'Lines Written at Thorp Green' - see later.)

While it bears many characteristics of a typical, fictional, Gondal poem; it is signed in Anne's own name (her Gondal poems are signed with the name of a Gondal character), and generally accepted as being auto-biographical - one of her 'pillars of witness'. It was written just six days after 'The Bluebell', a poem where she was reminiscing of a happy, carefree day - almost certainly at Scarborough during the previous month. It is clear that, as she settled back into the general routine at Thorp Green her spirit was sinking into a state of depression. Earlier in the year William Weightman had informed the Brontës that, during the summer, he would be leaving Haworth for several months for the purpose of obtaining his ordination, and he would be staying in Ripon - a town no more than ten miles from Thorp Green. Edward Chitham suggests that, judging from his usual 'warm but inconsistent character . . . it seems probable that he had made some promise, or half promise to Anne' to visit her at Thorp Green. If it is true that Anne was in love with him, and considering the home-sickness and depression she was beginning to experience, she would have been desperately longing for his visit. Weightman did spend some time in Ripon,109n  but he did not visit Anne, and it seems quite possible that the latter part of this poem is a reference to this.

(See also: Chitham, 'The Poems of Anne Brontë', p.75 & p.170)


Lines Written at Thorp Green

O! I am very weary
        Though tears no longer flow;
My eyes are tired of weeping,
        My heart is sick of woe.

My life is very lonely,
        My days pass heavily;
I'm weary of repining,
        Wilt thou not come to me?

Oh didst thou know my longings
        For thee from day to day,
My hopes so often blighted,
        Thou wouldst not thus delay.


Appeal

Oh, I am very weary,
        Though tears no longer flow;
My eyes are tired of weeping,
        My heart is sick of woe;

My life is very lonely,
        My days pass heavily,
I'm weary of repining,
        Wilt thou not come to me?

Oh, didst thou know my longings
        For thee, from day to day,
My hopes, so often blighted,
        Thou wouldst not thus delay!

Acton


Copyright © 1999 Michael Armitage

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